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SFGTV2
Mar 19, 2013 2:30am PDT
. so the idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom.
SFGTV
Mar 19, 2013 4:00pm PDT
girls to take over the stem industry. that's the science, technology, engineering and math. she is a scientist at one of the leading biotechnology companies. she is the founder of next gene girls. this was started at the grassroots, an organization commit today empowering young women for under represented communities to see themselves in science by introducing the girls to the wonders and the many -- to wonder of the many different scienceses such as engineering, technology and math professions. this is a visionary woman i set before you and it is a privilege to be able to honor her. but a little bit about who she is. she was born in the most beautiful part of san francisco. she was reared in the most wonderful promising talented part of san francisco. and without any further ado, you guys probably guess it had. that's bayview hunters point. you got to give the lady some credit. so, mom and dad, thank you very much for raising outstanding woman. (applause) >> now, ms. jackson, she understands the roadblocks and challenges many of our young people face when it comes to growing up in a
SFGTV
Mar 23, 2013 8:00am PDT
gender equality, gender equality in math and science is such a critical area. and i'm really pleased with such great honorees, but i'm focusing on an amazing, amazing teacher who began over 45 years ago at washington high school. and i think there's a lot of ego pride in our neighborhood. she is an amazing toeholder we are honoring for women's history month. her contribution is in the field of mathematics at washington high school, go back over 40 years. and she is always encouraging and challenging girls and young women to study advanced courses and to consider opportunities in majoring in math and science and going on to really apply their learning. but i think she's -- when i review the different comments about her from less experienced teachers and students, the words that come out are nurturing and supportive and just a really person that brings everyone together as well. one of the events that washington high does is the pie day or pi day. i know in the math department the teachers bring different types of pies. it is an atmosphere of sharing and mutual support she brings to re
SFGTV
Mar 18, 2013 6:00am PDT
impact. >> whereas the landmark 2010 aau study why so few, the women in science engineering in mathematics shows statistics women in this field. these barriers include stereo types, gender bias in the colleges and universities. the continue to block women's progress in these fields and offers recommendations to further open [inaudible] in 1998, aau launch a summer camp to help middle school 7th grade girls to continue their interests in engineering and math. despite [inaudible] to address the deficiencyings /tkepl -- demonstrated in the 2010 report. those girls that would benefit most from the program and as a reflection of this commitment to /soes owe economic diversity, the aauw [inaudible] week long residential camp conducted at stanford university and sonoma state universities and... >> whereas more than 150 [inaudible] unique program often setting them on an of the program have come from everett [inaudible] james [inaudible] martin luther king junior, [inaudible] clear lily, hoovers james lake, benjamin franklin middle school. each school receives copies of the odd vocatio
SFGTV
Mar 23, 2013 7:30am PDT
women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. >> i want to welcome all of you to this very full house and this wonderful celebration for women's history month to recognize the efforts of women in our great city and county of san francisco. women's history month is a time to appreciate the contributions of our women leaders in our communities who have been courageous in proving the quality of life for all san franciscans. since 1996, the san francisco commission and the department on the status of women ~ has recognized the vital work and contributions of women throughout our community through this program, and i would like to invite dr. emilie morasi who is the executive director of that agency to say a few words about the history of this event. >> thank you very much, president chiu. i am joined today by commissioner kay [speaker not understood]. i'd like to ask her to come on up. she's very familiar with these chambers, having served as clerk for many, many years. and if there are any other commissioners who joined us, please come on up. i have just returned from jap
SFGTV
Mar 23, 2013 8:00pm PDT
communities. there is also a gender divide as well in math and sciences and we need our champions like gail [speaker not understood] to continue their work. and i just wanted to honor you for your over 40 years at washington high school. so, thank you so much and can we have a hand for ms. barrett. thank you. (applause) >> thank you very much, supervisor mar, for this great honor. and i thank dennis kelly and president of the usf and linda mag for attending and nominating me. ~ plaque i do want to thank last but not least my husband who is here who has put up with my an ticks for the last, i hate to say 40 years, but it has been 40 years. it's a job i really, really like doing and no day is ever the same. and every day presents new challenges and i embrace these. i just want to say i looked at many of these fine women who preceded me, and i would suspect hopefully they took math in high school and did not drop out. it's very important and it's [speaker not understood] filter for getting into the sciences. if you can't get through the filter called calculus, you get nowhere. and we real
PBS
Mar 21, 2013 11:00pm PDT
, and extraordinary new ways of looking at science and medicine when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. the middle east where president obama is in the midst of a three day visit to israel it marks his first visit to the country as president, speaking in jerusalem today the prident urged israelies to make sacrifices in the interests of sustainable peace with the palestinians. >> israelis must recognize that continued settlement activity is counterproductive to the cause of peace. and that an independent palestine must be viable, with real borders that have to be drawn. >> rose: the president also affirmed that america will continue to stand behind israel. he made a targeted appeal to the youth in attendance. >> and today i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there is no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america, atem lo lavat. (applause) you are not alone. >> rose: joining me martin indyk, director of fore
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 8:00am EDT
course, the first war in which science and scientists played a central and vital role. the manhattan project, the thousands of physicists and other scientists who developed the atomic bomb was the most dramatic illustration of this, i think probably today almost as well known were the thousands of mathematicians and other sign b terrific work withers in england and washington, d.c. who broke the german e anything ma, cipher and other access codes. the very small group of parish parish -- british and american scientists who really turned the tide in the battle against the u-boats are not so nearly well known at all. but their contribution was, i think, every bit as vital not only in winning one of the most crucial battles in the war against nazi germany, but also for its lasting consequences in revolutionizing the very way military commanders think about war. for that matter, revolution eyeing the way quantitative an access could be apply today a host of practical problems in the business world through the new science patrick plaqueet and his -- blacket and his scientists created duri
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 6:00am EDT
one disease or organ system but could benefit everything, new ways of doing science. since i came out of the genome project, as an example of an project that benefits everything, always looking for examples like that. that is a great and wonderful, exciting thing to be able to do, to be able to try to steer this massive ship in a direction that will have the greatest public benefit in the shortest time. >> two years ago, i did interview with christopher hitchens. it may have been close to his last. he died about a year later. i want to run this clip. [video clip] >> francis collins, who did the human genome project, and who brought it in under budget, we are on opposite sides of the religious debate. we became friends. he is a very convinced christian. we became friendly debaters, and he has taken a very kindly interest in my case and has helped me have my genome sequenced to look for a more perfect, identifiable match for a mutation that is peculiar to me. >> how did you become friends? >> as christopher said, we started out as debating about the topic of science and faith. in fact,
SFGTV2
Mar 19, 2013 2:00am PDT
system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it cou
SFGTV
Mar 19, 2013 8:00pm PDT
much. i chose to apply my science and policy education towards sustainability. i have worked for more than 15 years in community forestry, conservation based development, water quality science, fixing national environmental programs and now working to harmonize to build a natural [speaker not understood] in san francisco and the bay area. i've been lucky to work with dedicated and really big hearted people. all of whom believe we can and should do more to reduce our ecological footprint and are working to figure out how. through my work today at spur and with friends of the urban forest, we're helping to move the city forward towards a more sustainable future where there are trees and sidewalk gardens everywhere, where we have zero carbon and an imminently [speaker not understood], not just preparing climate change, but doing everything we can to stop it. i have an [speaker not understood] policy science education and social responsibility and to get to do it here in san francisco where most people believe this is the right direction to be going, any city can demonstrate a model of su
CNN
Mar 23, 2013 6:30am PDT
science in space putting civilization at risk? the delightful discovery. the sweet realization that you have a moment all to yourself. well, almost. splenda® no calorie sweetener. splenda® makes the moment yours™. splenda® no calorie sweetener. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. waiting for your wrinkle cream to work? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair has the fastest retinol formula. to visib
CBS
Mar 25, 2013 5:30pm PDT
and prevention suggests parents are risker their children's health. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> reporter: parents may think they are doing the right thing but doctors say the growing problems of diabetes may be caused by infant diets. >> reporter: he gets only breast milk. but a new study found 40% of babies under 40 months are getting solid food. >> mashing up fruit with rice cereal. >> sometimes you like them to have solid foods because they sleep better. [ laughter ] >> under 4 months we need to make it clear that has been shown to be related to higher risks of asthma. >> diabetes. each baby is unique but the ability to digest develops slowly. they recommend solid food only after six months. but 93% of babies by then are already eating solids, most with doctor approval. >> maybe give them cereal to start out with. >> reporter: he recommended daily cereal but the parents say they will wait. reporting live, health and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> once it is authenticated a work out could be a new world record. [ music playing ] >>
SFGTV2
Mar 18, 2013 8:30pm PDT
, like they were merely getting older. i want to talk about that science and how we try to apply in use it to helping people in need. first of all, i want to say that there is a special thing about this plasticity as it relates to ourselves. that is to say it is constructed on the basis of moment to moment association of things that go together or the things that are expected to occur in the next moment in time. one thing that always goes with everything we feel, everything we do, every act we have had, every thought is a reference to the actor, to the player, to the doer, and that references to ourself. all of that derives massive plastic self-reference. we have to construct and enrich a strongly center itself, a person, in our brain through its changing itself in a powerful, plastic way. we're also constructed through these same processes to attach to the other people, to the other things we are close to in life. that is the basis of the attachment of the mother to the child or the child to the mother. through millions of the events of contact and interaction, all of those counts
PBS
Mar 17, 2013 6:30pm PDT
answering it. >> what do you say to the secularist? >> i say let's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that
SFGTV2
Mar 18, 2013 8:00pm PDT
post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california on a leave of absence from the science corporation, and i profit by what they
KICU
Mar 24, 2013 1:30am PDT
memorial chapel to remember the life of retired political science professor ted norton, who passed away at the age of ninety on february 7th. his journey at san jose state started in 1960. nortons nephew, steve rule, says since then sjsu was his uncles home. i really now as i get to know the situation better and hear the kind things that were said about him today is just i realize that this was truly his family and i think he would want everyone to remember him that way and to remember san jose state the same way. this is a community and a family and i think he was proud to be on it. peter buzanski, who once shared an office with norton, says his frien and colleague brought big changes to the university. he fought very hard to turn this university into a liberal arts university, know he had a great deal of help from president robert clark. today sjsu is a liberal arts school. norton used his modest professor salary to fund multiple endowments to help faculty and students. he gave virtually all he had back to this university and that is a very rare thing, that shows the kid of generosity
SFGTV
Mar 18, 2013 9:30pm PDT
representative, urs, and i will introduce the science who led that team and acted as the consultant to recommend the design criteria and the dvs led the consulting to the tjpa to make sure that the recommendations coming from urs, were reasonable and prudent. and did not not over or under address, the concerns and the nature of the facility and more appropriate for the nature of the facility. widening the associates and specializes in particular, on structural and blast analysis, and vehicle force protection. they have one in 64 years of experience, in that arena since experience with federal laboratories, courthouses embassies, as well as working on the pentagon and many of the same facilities in the city of new york, where dvs has addressed general security issues. they have focused on blast and force protection on those facilities. also as part of the peer review and consulting team to tjpa is code consultants ink. cci, and they focus particularly on fire protection and fire life safety issues and were extensively involved in the peer review of the bus fire and train fire scenari
CBS
Mar 24, 2013 6:00pm PDT
developed tools ♪ ♪ we built the wall ♪ ♪ we built the pyramids ♪ math, science, history, unraveling the mystery ♪ ♪ that all started with a big bang ♪ ♪ bang! ♪ [ alarm beeps, dog whimpers ] [ music plays ] you're always on. so we're always ready. tyson grilled & ready chicken. made with all white meat 98% fat free, and fully cooked with great grilled taste. right out of the bag. we'll take care of dinner. you take care of everything else. tyson grilled & ready chicken. the smartest way to eat right. [ male announcer ] the chevrolet cruze eco has active aero grille shutters to improve aerodynamics. so it can offer an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon, the best highway fuel economy of any gas engine in america. that's american ingenuity. to find new roads. [ male announcer ] time won't stop you from feeling beautiful. introducing nexxus youth renewal. now, visibly combat 8 signs of aging hair. ♪ ♪ our breakthrough nexxus youth renewal elixir replenishes and revitalizes. for vibrant, youthful-looking hair in 7 days. [ woman ] now, timeless beauty lives on. [ male announc
MSNBC
Mar 22, 2013 12:00pm PDT
encouraged to do whatever it takes to win. the science of win is just as biological as it is mental. take dog hammers, for one example. for women handlers who befriend their competition before a show. testosterone levels actually decrease. for men it continues to rise, fueling their competitive drive. ladies, don't fret. the science also shows that we are actually better at risk taking. here to help us and you identify your own competitive style and tip the odds in your favor is best selling author, the author of top dog. winning and losing. in the book you write from champion tennis players to nba students to army recruits to jeopardy contestants, even children just racing across the playground. women and men compete differently. how so? >> well, women are actually very good at judging the odds of whether they're going to win or lose. women are very sensitive to those odds. on wall street, female financial analysts, they're 7.3% more accurate than male financial analysts. a brand new study just this week showed that women-run hedge funds outperformed male-run hedge funds. all that
ABC
Mar 24, 2013 5:30pm PDT
met you and this is crazy ♪ >> is there a science why certain songs get stuck in our heads. tonight, though, the brand-new research on how to get those songs out. hose songs out. eens for help finding the one that's right for you... like centrum silver. now, buy one, get one half off with balance rewards card. at the corner of happy and healthy. for over 30 years. and it's now the most doctor recommended, the most preferred and among the most studied. so when it comes to getting the most out of your multivitamin, the choice is clear. centrum. always your most complete. hmm, we need a new game. ♪ that'll save the day. ♪ so will bounty select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet. the only one with trap + lock technology. look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbent than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand. use less. with the small but powerful picker upper, bounty select-a-size. but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst c
ABC
Mar 23, 2013 6:00pm PDT
enough to park cars in, plus good evening -- gadgets. >> looks like a science fiction movie set. the ideal buyer is somebody who is not faint of heart or light of wallet. >> if you don't want to make the upgrade yourself, there's actually a company specializing in do-overs of bomb shelters. the shelter is priced to move at just a cool half million dollars. >>> new video of the meteor that lit up the east coast. people all along the east coast said they saw a brief and bright light in the sky. this is a shot of the image in delware. now to more video of the meteor from virginia. nasa officials say the flash appears be a single meteor event. there were reported sitings from maine to south carolina. >>> nothing here, though. nice calm weather going on tonight. leigh glaser has a check of the forecast. >> leigh: certainly do a few high clouds overhead, that's it. all that live doppler hd is picking up. a few near san jose and a stream across the north bay throughout the course of the day. here you can see from the high definition east bay cam looking over the bay, you can see a few of th
FOX News
Mar 23, 2013 10:00pm PDT
of behavioral science? >> i think i do not want a may wore who is a behavioral scientist ex-pairmenting. the point, we should just have the death penalty for smokers. >> they do have a death penalty self-induced. >> everything you can do to try to discourage behavior all comes down on the smoker. there is lots of behavior are that is worse. i praise the mayor for the campaign against teenage pregnancy as he calls it. the problem is unwed pregnancy and the liberals in the new york times upset about the shaming campaign. shaming clearly works. liberals love shaming. >> i agree. >> they love stigmatizing. when they pretend to be wednesday unwed motherhood they can't against it or allow stigmatizing. >> geraldo: before we get to liberals being against the stigmatization of unwed pregnancy stick to the cigarette displays. is the mayor right and isn't this is a giant step in the nanny state it. >> yes, and like big gulp. i think people are aware. i always claim i don't believe the studies on smoking but i'm joking. people snow smoking is bad for you and all of the stick the worldc
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 3:00pm EDT
in forecast, what physics meteorologist and the natural sciences can teach us about economics, physicist explain the ebb and flow of market of economy can relate to science. look for the title in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near too future on booktv and booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at the prime time lineup for tonight. .. now author sara carr explores the results of the state legislature's decision shortly after hurricane katrina to re-assign control over the majority of new orleans public schools to the recovery school district, administered by the state. by following a student, teacher, and a principal as they traverse different segments of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during th
Current
Mar 26, 2013 3:00pm PDT
also said the science is inconclusive but added that the children of gay couples deserve a voice. >> michael: now that is a compelling argument. in the end the court might actually make it's a decision not on the merits of the case but on a procedural issue called standing. whether the opponents who brought this case are even the right people to defend the ban. the court did the exact same thing when it first took up the issue of interracial marriage. a few years later the court issued a final ruling make it legal across the nation. back here in california a new poll shows that 67% of voters think same-sex couples should be able to marry. that's a full two-thirds and just 30% now support the original prop 8 ban. it's really incredible. the court is expected to issue its final decision by june. joining me now is mike sacks from washington. thank so much for joining us in "the war room." >> you're welcome. >> michael: does that shift in public opinion play into the court's ruling at all? >> i don't know. it played into a couple of justice's reasoning. justice sotomayor said why not
SFGTV
Mar 19, 2013 10:00am PDT
california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. th
Current
Mar 26, 2013 6:00am PDT
ready to be blinded by science. >> sure. science >> stephanie: we believe in science here and also weirdly, emails because it involves the jar of hearts. ♪ no, i can't take one more step ♪ >> oh, god, not this song. >> who is this? lana del ray. >> no. christina perry. >> and you are -- >> no this was a big song. >> stephanie: what i do use for the national scientific journal? no i use noses. science -- scientists can grow noses on the human heart. bitter party of two? can we have a table? >> i have been here a day and a half and i'm already in tiers. ♪ the ice inside your soul ♪ >> i can kerry has a jar [ inaudible ]. >> stephanie: gawker writes why get a kidney off the black market when you can grow one in a jar. bioengineered noses -- been there, done that and parts of human hearts build organs for transplants. why wait for people to die just to get their organs. here is the awesome science part patients wouldn't be subject to the dangerous process of getting -- i'm going to say rejection -- and i'm sorry, please don't cry -- >> i'm fine. >> stephanie: the transplan
SFGTV
Mar 19, 2013 4:30pm PDT
impressive educational resume. masters in science, ph.d. in para cytology of tulane university, post doctorate work at rice university, medical degree from the university of pennsylvania in my hometown philadelphia, resident in medicine and fellowship in critical care in anesthesia from ucsf. she joined the ucsf faculty in 1990. in 1999 she was appointed chief of anesthesia at san francisco general, a position she held until 2005. in 2004 she was appointed associate dean. besides currently serving as vice dean, she is also currently a professor of clinical anesthesia and medicine where she is educating the next generation of doctors at ucsf. in her time at ucsf dr. carlysle has won numerous awards, including the stuart c. colin award for clinical excellence and faculty clinical award, the elliott rapoport award for%backerfor commitment to san francisco general, and chancellor's faculty award for the advancement of women. for decades ucf doctors like dr. carlysle have staffed and run san francisco general hospital providing serve isx for people all over the city including many of our
PBS
Mar 21, 2013 4:00pm PDT
looking for answers. a ballot yes, but every time we find the answer in science, it leads to more questions. that is part of the fun. there are two aspects that are extremely strange, one is the power specter. it is as if you were listening to music and there was and i don't and the song. that is something that we see in the distribution of the spots on the cosmic mac background. and there is an even more i the thing, which is it seems to be tilted sort of in the plane, as if you were on a large ship and decided to leave your head. it is very odd. >> what does all of that mean? does it mean that the findings you are disputing ord is reorganizing how we think about the universe? >> it is probably reorganizing the thinking. this is a big discovery and science because we scientists like to put out theories. dairies are the best explanations of the data we have. -- theories are the best explanations of the data we have, but when we get new data, it means new theories. >> does it matter, we are talking 14 billion years, 15 billion, does it matter that it happened before we thought it h
FOX News
Mar 23, 2013 11:00pm PDT
rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> greg: let's find out if we have gotten anything wrong so far. for that we go to tv's andy levy. let's have some fun, right? >> no. >> greg: i was kind of hoping. >> you did not hire me to have fun. you you hired me to kill fun and i do a damn good job of it. >> greg: you do. you treat fun like roaches. >> i do. department of education website features quote. you agreed with greg bernie that this could only happen in the obama administration. >> of course. >> if the website automatically generates quotes from a database of quotes last updated in 2007 you real illini what this means, right? >> greg: they are blaming bush! >> this is bush's fault. >> greg: they are blaming bush! >> he is right actual. >> i we corrected. >> you are right. >> greg: amazing. >> an infiltrator no doubt. >> greg: time traveler. it was a time traveler. >> a fellow traveler. >> greg: i got about you. >> that is not even what i meant. >> greg: okay. a little play on fellow traveler. >> greg: , oh, that's funny. >> thanks. >> greg: took awhile.
PBS
Mar 25, 2013 10:00pm PDT
. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a recent chill in u.s.-afghan relations showed signs of a slight spring thaw today. it came as america's top diplomat sat down with afghanistan's leader to hash out differences. frantic was today's watch word as secretary of state john kerry made an unannounced visit to kabul meeting with president hamid karzai and smoothing over u.s.-afghan tensions at a joint news conference. >> i appreciate enormously our friendship. and i know that you share with me a sense that this next year could well be one of the most important in the modern history of afghanistan. >> ifill: the show of unity followed new flare-ups as the u.s. winds down its combat mission there. after a deadly bombing this month, karzai was quoted as saying the u.s. colluded with th
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 3:30pm EDT
and majoring in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me w
SFGTV
Mar 18, 2013 8:30am PDT
, history, social studies, science and technical subjects in common course state standards and also to highlight and amplify key language [inaudible] that are critical for el's to succeed in school while they are developing english. tonight you'll hear a little bit about our work to date. so the purpose is also to provide opportunities to en/hreurb learners to access and engage with -- in light of the next generation content standards. it's critical that this be a tool that is deeply understood and used by all teachers. we've been engaged in making this happen with our partners from humanities and math and sciences. so we're gonna talk just briefly about the key shifts in the 2012 california eld standard. so on the left is reflecting the old standards and the right side is really representing that shift in what the new standards are providing with in terms of opportunity for our english learns and how we work with them. and i'll just highlight a couple of each slides. the first one i'm gonna talk about is the use of simply fied text and activities /a*ufpb separate from content knowl
SFGTV2
Mar 21, 2013 4:00am PDT
science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans r
SFGTV2
Mar 19, 2013 4:00am PDT
any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that pu
MSNBC
Mar 18, 2013 12:00pm PDT
u.s. science research for decades. they said this drop in funding will force to us cancel all new programs and research initiatives, probably for at least two years. is that going to put a damper on our future prospects? >> if the sequester holds in its current form for the ten years that it is supposed to, then yes, the answer is there will definitely be horrible consequences. i think before we go to the bad news, you need to give a little context. the good news is that america has been investing in research and development. it has been investing in science and technology at a very high rate. in 2009, thanks partly to the stimulus, the u.s. investment matched the previous high at the space race at 2.9 of gdp. that amount of money being poured into public and private research. so we've come down a little because of the budget cuts already put in place and we've come down much more because of the sequester. that speaks exactly to what i was argue ewing in my special report. the federal government tends to either not really help or actively get in the way. in this inassistance it wo
CBS
Mar 24, 2013 8:30am PDT
the country since 2009. and they say north korea is pouring money into science and technology. a full investigation into last week's attack could take weeks. >>> california investigators are taking another look at cold cases. right now authorities are combing through dna left behind by killers and rapists. so far it has linked a serial killer who died in prison in 1999 to an unsolved murder in 1990. >>> a legend among the fitness world has died. yesterday bodybuilder joe weeder died of heart failure at his los angeles home. arnold schwarzenegger credits his fitness career to him. he also published in fitness magazine. >>> the battle over the mental health care of state has back to court on wednesday. a federal judge will consider whether billions of dollars invested over the past two decades have improved the system. if the judge rules the conditions have improved, control will be returned from the courts to the state. advocates for the prisoners say basic rights are still being violated and the suicide rate is getting worse. a ruling is expected next month. >>> city college of s
LINKTV
Mar 25, 2013 11:30pm PDT
1967. >> global science is going on throughout the world, and gobabeb is, of course, a sought-after location because it's thought to be quite isolated and not being influenced by a lot of industry and other human activity. [wind whistling] >> local topnaar communities, namibian scientists, and researchers from around the globe come here to gather data on how to live sustainably with our environment. miya kabajani and american scientist christine grummon collect climate data here for noaa, the united states' national oceanic and atmospheric administration. >> they have these monitoring sites all over the world, and the namib desert is a site where their sampling is done for carbon dioxide. >> the air sample from this high pole is stored in these bottles and sent back to noaa in colorado for analysis. the data is used by scientists like francois engelbrecht of south africa's center for scientific and industrial research to track and model the effects of rising greenhouse gas emissions. the data shows the global temperature has increased by about one degree celsius in the last century.
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2013 6:00am EDT
how those risks can be minimized. this senate commerce, science and transportation subcommittee hearing is an hour 15 minutes. >> [inaudible] >> good morning. we are delighted to have this meeting in the new congress of our science and space subcommittee. nasa and the space programs have been in the news a lot in the past year. some really impressive feats, and we're going to be talking about some of those from rover on mars to the birthing of the spacex capsule at the international space station. i am delighted to have my colleague, senator chris in texas, as our ranking member. -- senator chris. it seems like texas and florida have some interest in the space program. and i'm looking forward to his leadership and i would ask for his opening statement. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. let me echo those sentiments and say how much i'm looking forward to working with you on this subcommittee. spaceflight and our capacity to maintain world leading advantage in spaceflight is a critical priority for the nation. and certainly a critical priority both for the state of texas and the s
Current
Mar 21, 2013 4:00pm PDT
% of a degree. that that's nothing. and that's why science actives working so hard at this. also, this global warming study category four and five hurricanes in all ocean basins have increased at a rate of about 25% to 30%. this is no joke, this is science. let's bring in a science nick maloshus as stanford, thanks for being on "the young turks" today. >> thanks for having me. michael: tell us what kind of big news pete is. how innovative and exciting is this for people really worried about this issue? >> i think it's a really interesting technique in that it adds to the efficiency of systems already in place. if you think about these large power towers where you take reflective mirrors and focus it on to a central tower to create steam, this increases the efficiency so it becomes economically viable. michael: explain what we are looking at here. we are looking at pete. explain what's going on, that sort of yellow gray thing at the top and take us through how it works. >> yeah, so this is a simplified diagram of how the physical process would actually work. we have two parallel plates
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2013 7:00am EDT
marriage act case which will be taken up on wednesday. here is the christian science monitor -- there she is. a federal judge agreed with windsor and agreed that domagk violated her rights. -- doma violated her rights. it goes on to say -- on twitter -- william in hikers town -- excuse me, dennis in florida, republican. good morning. any bigbefore we allow construction projects to go on in the united states, we require their to be environmental impact study to see if it will harm the least creature's among us. we do not seem to want to do any environmental impact study to see how a homosexual marriage will impact our children. in terms of the religious issue -- host: the d.c. the news last week that the pediatric association came out and said that they do not see any harmful effects on children? caller: i did see that. there is another pediatric association that took exactly the opposite stand, which shows that all of this is politically motivated. they are all subject to pressure from various groups. either literally or two pediatric groups that took a totally different sides of the issu
MSNBC
Mar 22, 2013 9:00am PDT
and big pharma. but is the biggest culprit -- big junk? we'll talk the science and business of addictive food with, author michael moss, coming up next. ♪ i'm your venus [ female announcer ] what does beauty feel like? find out with venus embrace. every five-bladed stroke gives you 360 degrees of smooth for goddess skin you can feel and feel. ♪ i'm your venus only from venus embrace. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. go. ♪ keep on going in this direction. take this bridge over here. there it is! [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. [ laughter ] [ male announcer ] earn points with the citi thankyou card and redeem them for just about anythi
CBS
Mar 20, 2013 4:30am PDT
beverage association but the story is more about sensationalism than science. >>> it is going to cost you a quarter to get paper bags in santa cruz. a countywide charge of 25 cents per gay bag is set to gush per bag is set to go into effect in april. >>> they are trying to put to an end bullying. she has been target by herman engineer despite having a disability. the group is scheduled to get underway at noon at the hospital. >>> a group is fighting discrimination with paint. they painted the house in a rainbow of colors and they are protesting the church's stance against the lbg community >> they are embracing diversity. >> reporter: 4:49, we jumped ahead, it is 4:49 sal... >> as long as you are jumping ahead, could you jump ahead to friday, two hours is not enough. >> good morning everybody. let's take a look at the commute, traffic is looking well on 880 westbound and as you drive to the mcarthur maze, steve will let you know what the weather will be like and the roads are wet from overnight with some of the showers we have had and you might want to leave yourself extra time.
PBS
Mar 25, 2013 3:00pm PDT
enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing potatoes for generations. irish potato cons
SFGTV2
Mar 19, 2013 8:00am PDT
the 17th century where trade, industry and science were among the world. the one small port of amsterdam were one of the commercial centers in the entire world. this concentration of capital enriched bankers and merchants but also created the society in europe. the arch of the dutch golden age. 17th century travelers visiting holland remarked on the number of artist. typically western european artist on the monarch and the nobility as well as the very wealthie catholic church. an open market to a wide clientele that arranged from variety of merchants. it displays a modern domestic rather than extravagant or royal setting which it was carried. emily who is the director of the morris house. the expansion which i will talk about in an a little bit will give it more space. for the collection there is a limited pictures they can acquire but too large for the building. so where do the paintings come from? how can they be there. this is an exceptional and remarkable museum. this splendid 17th century city palace was constructed between 1633-1634 next to the dutch government. i was tol
SFGTV2
Mar 25, 2013 9:00am PDT
crosscurrent of science, engineeringnd architecture and art that all come together that looks at patterning quite well. it looks an is a narrative to key into the bay area. all of the areas have similar underlying values and if that narrative is built into building it could become quite powerful. it's also a series of dots and there is a great range in how one might render the building to start to the developed. let me pass down the materials and colors we are looking at. so the first piece that you see here is clear anodized aluminum in the pen rows pattern. that is an 18 inch square. the panel itself is roughly the size of two of those boards. so that panel is '116 of the whole panel exterior wall. there are no curves in these panels but the way the panels are motion to dismiss motion -- the panel will be '3'18 inch square. the panel itself is roughly the size of two of those boards. so that panel is '116 of the whole panel exterior wall. there are no curves in these panels but the way the panels are -- the panel will be '316 of an inch thick. it will be a very controllable sur
ABC
Mar 26, 2013 12:35am PDT
got bored. i love regular fiction but when i'm writing the science fiction and fantasy holds my attention better. >> stop. you are not going there. what about jared? >> he kissed her i kiss her. it's a cave community. >> it sounds more racy than it actually is. >> i just want to try one thing. >> reporter: meyer's stories bridge the gap between teen and adult fiction reminding us what it was like to fight the urges brought on by raging teenaged hormones. >> there is a great deal of sexual tension in your stories and most of it is unconsummated and tame. >> i think there is something magical about taking your time with physical attraction. if you make it so that every time someone brushes someone's hand. remember when you were 14 and that was a big deal. you know we skip over that a lot. >> reporter: how do you channel the 16-year-old girl in all of us? >> i don't think you ever lose the 16-year-old girl. apparently it's not so different that i'm not still a little in touch with that girl. >> reporter: meyer is an unlikely publishing phenom. the twilight installment was her first
ABC
Mar 22, 2013 4:00pm PDT
younger visitors and hopes to use the characters to entice many to pursue careers in math and science. >> the chair of the ftc announces he's leaving his post. >> emily chang joins us now with this afternoon's after the bell report. emily? >> good afternoon, carolyn carey. communications commission chairman says he will resign incoming week nose word on who his successor might be and announced news today focusing on broad band working to improve lives of americans his departure will leave two vacancies on the commission. sap's co-ceo got a 41% increase in compensation last year the package totalled $11 million. and about half is scheduled to pay hout in 2016. shares rose 50% last year. marin software shares soared in early trading and ended up around 16% stocks rising today on better than expected earnings. your bloomberg silicon valley index higher on shares of apple and mooul mooul and samsung reportedly in talks to sell a dutch sib sid yairy to amazon. the subsidiary makes e reader display technology. the market has been shrinking as more people turn to tablets. have a wonderful we
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 4:40pm EDT
studying math and science. we must fully embraced the diversity of asian americans. americans,nese currie and americans, a filipino americans. are 95 countries represented with in this district. have long consulted to better understand developments abroad. many are active in trading and investing in asia which is a source of our national wealth. but as congress i sponsor legislation to make it easier for state universities to teach strategic languages so that our .tudents are better equipped am a strong advocate for increasing the number of visas for foreigners receive advanced degrees. in the u.s. 76% of all registered patents from the top of from the top position producing units. they come from foreign students. foreign students in the u.s.. these inventors are driving economic prosperity with the consequences of their backgrounds in these hard sciences. in our current system we welcome foreign students to the united states. we provide them the education and the mason them home so they can compete against us and this makes sense. america's current the involvement was not be combi
CNBC
Mar 25, 2013 1:00pm EDT
contributing this as well. >> so far he has already come out on education, immigration and on science. >> and it's really smart. >> one of the reports had a long time gop guy getting involved. >> watch out for the google glasses. the legislator says it's like wearing a computer. it's dangerous and similar to texting and driving chblt. >> i haven't signed up. you remember that science project thing? get away from him to do this. you know, the geeks are very excited. i'm hesitant about people driving with anything on their face that doesn't have to be there. i can understand it. maybe it will make people better drivers. >> maybe this would help for gps. i have a gps that is on the dash. it could be easier. at the end of the day, people are so distracted. you don't need another distraction. >> i agree. the less that is distracting you the better. >> amazon studios adding zom beeland to prime instant video. >> what amazon is doing is interesting. they will put them on. anyone can watch them and give comments and vote on which of these pilots you want to see developed into full series. and
LINKTV
Mar 20, 2013 8:00am PDT
other two? [laughter] there be. there be. they're called engineers in science types, in physics types. in fact, they're us types, aren't they? what's the wavelength, gang? let's go. watch this, one, one, two, two, three, three, four, four, five, five, now it's 3/14. okay. so wavelength equals 3/14 of a what? - kilometer. - kilometer. okay? that's like 3,000 meters divided by 14. why did you pick a four, man? i mean--how many times does 14 go into 3,000? does anyone have a calculator? 214.28571. 214 meters long. is that surprising to you? that's like two football fields and then some. so the wavelength of your favorite radio station is more than two football fields long. radio waves are long or short compared to light waves, gang? we'll do the same thing for light waves later on and find out it's a smidge, smidge, smidge, smidge, smidge. zero's go the other way. yey. anyway, that's how you find the wavelength of something. i can show you the slinky here. can someone grab the end of this for an "a" in the course. [laughter] right over here. now, i'm gonna take this wave and i'm go
CNBC
Mar 24, 2013 11:00pm EDT
... >> isn't she beautiful? >> ...a triumph of science, vision, money, and an abundance of ego. >> i just wanted the biggest boat. let's admit it. >> it's ego. what? i mean... >> do i have an ego? yes. >> if there were a hall of fame for business tycoons, tom perkins would be a first-ballot shoo-in. he has earned a fortune, and, boy, does he know how to spend it. [ engine revs, tires screech ] >> the troubles at hewlett-packard started when then-c.e.o. carly fiorina was abruptly fired. >> out the door. is that really -- it was that cold? >> that's exactly what happened. >> devastated? you had to have been. >> of course i was devastated. i was hurt. >> welcome to "60 minutes on cnbc." i'm lesley stahl. in this edition, we examine the boardroom intrigue at hewlett-packard between 2005 and 2007. it was a tumultuous saga that led to criminal charges, executive firings, accusations of sexism, and lots and lots of finger-pointing. and in the midst of it all, three of the protagonists told me their sides of the story -- pattie dunn, thomas perkins, and carly fiorina. we begin with pattie dunn. i
FOX News
Mar 23, 2013 8:00pm PDT
. >> you said for the left the problem with socialism is that it is an imperfect science so they excuse things when they don't go right. for the left it is the people that are imperfect. >> greg: that is what i said! >> socialism itself is not an imperfect science. >> greg: i said capitalism is an imperfect science. socialism is always the fault of the practitioner. we agreed but i stated it poorly. >> i agree with you, yes. >> watching the ncaa. >> georgetown is getting killed, man. >> saturday night. >> no, i'm not. >> got him on that. >> gun free zone app. pab you you said they are pointing out that the app can be used by both sides. an interesting idea and in some years someone could compile stats and see which zones had gun related deaths. we do that now. look at chicago and wag, washington. >> that is a good point. a good point. we have seen chicago is a perfect example actually. >> absolutely. greg, you asked what if the united states was organized by zones. you mean like states? we could have like 50 of them and then the people who live in the 50 zones could pass their own laws?
FOX Business
Mar 19, 2013 7:00pm EDT
appropriations, chairman of the subcommittee on commerce, justice, and science. thanks for being here. i want to first get a sense of where we are in the investigation. the fbi. how soon do you expect it will be revealing the contents? he tried to leave the kutcher for china. >> he's in prison. he's in jail. they should be within the next couple of days. lou: we listen to fbi director muller talk about how serious the problem has become. i have a strange feeling that if we did not have your voice on this right now there would not be a discussion of what is happening in nasa. various science centers, our national laboratories, and the full breadth of what is the chinese spying efforts of all sorts in this country, not just simply cyber spying, but 3500 from companies. this is a major threat against this country. >> it is a major threat. every major american company has been hit with a cyber attack. everyone. i have seen the list. the university's, foundations, major law firms. they hit my area. they took everything off of my computer a few years ago. people have been reluctant to speak out about
FOX
Mar 25, 2013 5:00pm PDT
children's health. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler has more. >> reporter: parents may think they are doing the right thing but doctors say the growing problems of diabetes may be caused by infant diets. >> reporter: he gets only breast milk. but a new study found 40% of babies under 40 months are getting solid food. >> mashing up fruit with rice cereal. >> sometimes you like them to have solid foods because they sleep better. [ laughter ] >> under 4 months we need to make it clear that has been shown to be related to higher risks of asthma. >> diabetes. each baby is unique but the ability to digest develops slowly. they recommend solid food only after six months. but 93% of babies by then are already eating solids, most with doctor approval. >> maybe give them cereal to start out with. >> reporter: he recommended daily cereal but the parents say they will wait. reporting live, health and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> once it is authenticated a work out could be a new world record. [ music playing ] that is a lot of hula hoops. the listing is for the mos
CNBC
Mar 26, 2013 6:00pm EDT
." >>> and later, bill of health. all week, cramer's checking out the cutting-edge science behind some of the biggest players in the biotech industry. tonight, a company forming a pipeline to fight devastating diseases. is it time to get behind their efforts. >>> plus, extended stay. from beverly hills to the sun-soaked florida coast, ashford hospitality trust owns rooms with a view across the country. as travel spending continues to increase, could it provide the perfect accommodations for your cash. cramer talks with the ceo. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question, tweet cramer #madtweets. send jim an e-mail to "mad money"@cnbc.com. or give us a call. 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.com. ♪ ♪ i don't want any trouble. i don't want any trouble either. ♪ [ engine turns over ] you know you forgot to take your mask off, right? [ siren wailing in distance ] ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new beetle convertible. now every day is a top-down day. that's the of german e. [ male annou
SFGTV
Mar 18, 2013 10:30am PDT
to go to the california academy of science and to me those are the kind of things that need to be acknowledged from the ground work up and and the participation of that many people. 800 showed up, district provided the bussing and i think we need to see more of that. and in terms of reaching the african american community an where we wanna be heading. >> that is definitely worth mentioning. thank you. >> any other reports are board members. >> i just wanted to congratulate [inaudible] new position of supervisor of district four. >> okay. item t, report of closed session actions. there are many of them. bear with me [inaudible] i'm /rae reading the closed session actions of march 25, 20130. the board of education approved [inaudible] and the board of /epbl case by a vote of seven is, approved the will not re/tphu new tragically killed on march 2 wheel walking home from her 17th birthday party. she is kind and highly gifted. and track team. her parents re/kw quest do nations be made to the l low el track and cross country team in public schools in sacramento cull any mating in our g
CNN
Mar 21, 2013 4:00pm PDT
science. >> things were once thought to be extinct can in and out be brought back from the dead. so there is hope for nbc. it could turn around. >> reporter: we called nbc for comment but got none. of course comedians always bite the hand that feeds them. listen to howard stern rip apart the chief financial officer of his employer, sirius/xm radio amid contract negotiations. >> why the. [ beep ] would i take a pay cut when i'm the one who is actually performed? can you [ beep ] whoever the [ beep ] you are. i never heard of you. >> reporter: todays later, howard agreed to a new contract, terms undisclosed. the moral of the story, beware of antagonizing a man with a mike. a big mike. taking the cake was charlie sheen attacking his by then ex-boss, executive producer chuck lori. >> sad and stupid had a foul odor attached it to, it would you. you picked a fight with a war lock you little worm. >> reporter: sort of makes jay's jokes seem gentle. >> st. patrick drove all the snakes out of ireland. >> reporter: jeannie moos, cnn. >> and then they came into the united states and became nbc
FOX
Mar 20, 2013 4:30am PDT
about sensationalism than science. >>> it is going to cost you a quarter to get paper bags in santa cruz. a countywide charge of 25 cents per gay bag is set to gush per bag is set to go into effect in april. >>> they are trying to put to an end bullying. she has been target by herman engineer despite having a disability. the group is scheduled to get underway at noon at the hospital. >>> a group is fighting discrimination with paint. they painted the house in a rainbow of colors and they are protesting the church's stance against the lbg community >> they are embracing diversity. >> reporter: 4:49, we jumped ahead, it is 4:49 sal... >> as long as you are jumping ahead, could you jump ahead to friday, two hours is not enough. >> good morning everybody. let's take a look at the commute, traffic is looking well on 880 westbound and as you drive to the mcarthur maze, steve will let you know what the weather will be like and the roads are wet from overnight with some of the showers we have had and you might want to leave yourself extra time. the morning commute is looking good on the bay
MSNBC
Mar 18, 2013 1:00pm PDT
weak. >> anti-woman. anti-science. >> we weren't inclusive. >> anti-gay. anti-worker. >> there's a long list of them. >> the list goes on and on and on. >> buck up or stay in the truck. buck up and run. >> i'd say, if i did run for office and win, i'd serve out my term. >> if standing for liberty and standing for the constitution makes you a wackobird, chen count me a proud wackobird. >> cpac had to cut back on its speakers this year by 300 pounds. >> barack obama, you lied. >> i think it's about dignity and respect. >> so this go-round, he's got the rifle, i've got the rack. >>> we begin with the republican party facing a serious case of the mondays. after a weekend carouse iing at cpac, no doubt downing a few in honor of st. patrick, today came the reckoning with the revelation of their own autopsy on what went badly wrong in 2012. this morning, it fell to rnc chair, reince priebus to give his party an uncompromising look in the rearview mirror. >> our message was weak. our ground game was insufficient. we weren't inclusive. we were behind in both data and digital. and our primar
Comedy Central
Mar 25, 2013 6:55pm PDT
knowable that we don't yet know but we'll know because of the advancement of knowledge and science over the centuries. but then there's is the unknowable. and what i try to get at in this book is that we appreciate that which can't be put into cognitive terms, like love, which we know through experience and interpersonal relationships. and we don't confuse as we sometimes are tempted to do the unknowable from that which we simply do not know yet. >> stephen: one of the things that i don't know is what you just said. i'm sure that's me. i'm sure there's people who go to nyu who understood when you just sesmed i want to talk about love. we can't know love but
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 4:30pm EDT
booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> up next on booktv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very well documented problems which we have failed as a profession to fix. and so i think we need the help more than anything else of the public. it's sort o
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 5:35pm EDT
in science syria. in a news over the last 48 hours inside syria. any news over the last 48 hours? guest: the state department has no evidence to show that the syrian government or the opposition -- there have been opposition -- accusations on both sides about using chemical weapons. there has been no evidence of that. the united nations is leading an effort to determine whether chemical weapons have been used. there are all kinds of technical things involved. they need to conduct these experts to determine if it is by a examination or looking at injuries to determine whether chemical weapons have been used. we have been told by people in the intelligence community the for the regime to use chemical weapons, there are logistical problems. thus far, there has been no evidence. host: a follow-up from one of our viewers. it is in the rebels' interest to use chemical weapons. there is no upside for president assad to do it. this headline from the baltimore sun. the president urging a palestinian state. remarks by president obama. [video clip] >> put yourself in their shoes. look at th
SFGTV2
Mar 18, 2013 7:00pm PDT
been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. w
KOFY
Mar 21, 2013 9:00pm PDT
understand is stem cell research, very complex science behind it. now, the california instituted for regenerative medicine is launching an effort to better understand such a complex issue. all by getting researchers to rethink the way they communicate with people. cheryl jennings with details. >> they work for a tax tax funded united states institute for stem cell are research. we'll let her explain it on elevator ride. >> it's an interesting discovery in a laboratory model and help them move into the clinic so it can be studied in humans. >> pretty clear. so why the elevator? directors recently launched a campaign called the elevator pitch challenge. idea is to teach cutting edge researchers how to explain their work to a stranger in the length of an elevator ride and make them care about it. >> when you tack you about your research. >> directors score the videos on clarity and creativity. some of the researchers were born performers. >> even though many people a year are dying of chronic lung disease, we don't have any -- >> and some are slightly more comfortable in front of a micr
FOX News
Mar 24, 2013 10:00pm PDT
university like the material girl. [laughter] i go to school for nursing some go to premed or sciences but don't you feel it makes sense to learn basic human anatomy that is the essential to a medical profession or even if you study biology? >> you are going into use surgery if you are fresh out of medical school or the bears watching 20 years? i would take the nurse. there is background and knowledge that is handy absolutely but the idea that comes from the classroom should be changed and we should spend more time being practical in the real world. >> that makes sense but if you don't have the background knowledge and you just know what you'd do by experiencing these firsthand that means you don't know how to fix your mistakes because he did and get the basic technical knowledge at school. >> my challenge is is the best way to sit in the classroom paying exorbitant amounts of money or could we get back more efficiently? john: next person. >> ideas graduated from school in indiana but is the engineering degree in human studies just as valid? it is not the same thing where does that misconc
ABC
Mar 21, 2013 6:00pm PDT
wednesday that. is fast. >> there is no doubt the science behind embryonic stem cell research can be complex so now, california institute for reagain ra tiff medicine is getting researchers to rethink the way they communicate. >> the taxpayer funded institute so what does she do? we'll let her explain it. >> i fund stem cell research cell research. and finding an interesting discovery in a laboratory model trying to help them move that into clinics to be studied in humans. >> pretty clear so why the elevator? >> i'm going to go ahead and explain the story. >> directors launched a campaign called elevator pitch challenge to teach cutting edge researchers how to explain works to a stranger in the length of a ride and... make them care bit. >> peoples eyes glaze over when you talk about research? >> directors scored videos on brevity, clarity and create activity. some researchers were born performers. >> 120,000 people a year are dying of chronic lung disease we zront any therapies. >> well, some looked they'd be more comfortable in front of a mike zone z those whose mastery of cell was
CNN
Mar 20, 2013 2:00pm PDT
dinosaurs came back to life? scientists work to revive extinct animals. this isn't science fiction, it's real. >>> i'm brianna keilar. >> and i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> the obama is standing with israel in a dangerous time in the region. >> his most urgent warning in syria, vowing that the assad regime will be held accountable if it has in fact used chemical weapons as the rebels claim. >> plet's go to jerusalem first with jessica. a very powerful meeting today. very interesting between the president and the prime minister. >> wolf, that's right. president obama here in jerusalem for the first overseas trip of his second term. a visit which in symbolism already president obama is emphasizing the u.s.'s commitment to ensuring israel's security and correcting any past sleights, real or perceived. president obama and prime minister netanyahu together in israel. they were acting like long-lost friends, joking, getting casual, complimenting each other's children while taking a little dig. >> they are very good looking young men
NBC
Mar 25, 2013 3:00am PDT
? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we should ban most things. i do think there are certain times we should infringe on your freedom and that is, for example, if you're drinking we shouldn't let you drive because you'll kill somebody else. if you are carrying a gun, we shouldn't let you on an airplane. there's a lot of things that we do -- if there's asbestos in the classroom we should remove the kids from classroom until you clean the air. if you want to own a gun, i certainly think it's constitutionally protected. you certainly have a right to have a gun if you want. if you want
CNN
Mar 26, 2013 8:00am PDT
moral question and what if i take you back to just before the commercial break when i say science is so good, we can outsmart the bad guys. how good is science and how good is our handling of science if we're to be so perfect as to snuff someone's life out state sanctioned? >> the bottom line is life in prison is the alternative. but that's still a life. it's a life different than one outside, but still a life. and when you do a study of the lives that these killers, that these animals lead, you'll find that they actually have a life. there is awake up, there is a morning, there is a routine, things that they do, things that they enjoy. the bottom line is it's up to each state to make its decision here and as long as it's applied properly and they get appeal after appeal after appeal and if there is evidence that comes forward, it's dealt with. the bottom line is we have it and when it's applied properly, i think it's appropriate. talk to some of these victims. >> i hear you and again, i'm going to hit this again and ryan, i want you to jump in on this. i don't think anybody out there d
CSPAN
Mar 26, 2013 6:00am EDT
look at the history of marriage institutions to me is not a science. it is not a cultural science. it is hypocrisy. the way you that you're saying if marriage social goal is to create more human beings, why do we even let people who do not conceive be married? you are not even let him be a bull or homosexual people to be married. ask them why we can help society? the third thing is the way you are segregating our society to say a man and women can get married, to me it is the same arguments not to a segregated society. based on what? our social goal for marriage is to reproduce? >> the time is up. we really need to get this down. >> i'm going to try to speak as quickly as possible. i have a lot of sympathy for mr. whelan's for letting it take its course. how deep into people who say this is taking too long and all of the gay couples in states where they did not have these rights, how do you answer that? what is your response to that? >> it is an anthropology that all social scientists recognize, people on the left, and this is not something i have come up with. this is the consens
CNN
Mar 22, 2013 12:00am PDT
appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> this is a great apartment. >> yes, but i'm dressed like a woman. >> it's cheap. >> yes, but i'm dressed like a woman. >> we will constantly be surrounded by beautiful girls. >> it is nice and airy, isn't it. >> so gentlemen, joined by peter scolari, your great friend of more than 35 years. you starred together in "bosom buddies." you keep bringing up my tabloid muckraking. we bring up your cross-dressing past. the obvious question for both of you, are you still wearing women's clothes? >> currently? >> only to appear taller. that's all. the heels do make you a little taller. >> you mean right now? >> those are for the pilot. we had bob tortoricci was our costumer for the actual series, not the pilot. he put us in -- he would come into our dressing room, say tom, i think we're going to start you out in fuchsia. >> very serious. >> very serious. >> holding up fabric. can you put on this wrap. you know what we were told, i'm sure you'll recall, the drag element, that's just going to be for the pilot. th
CNBC
Mar 25, 2013 11:00pm EDT
-- invest in innovation? it's the latest gadget to drive profit in your portfolio. medical science is leading the way with breakthrough technology. tonight, cramer's kicking off a week-long series highlighting some of the most revolutionary companies that maybe heading higher. >>> plus, pour on the profits? infrastructure in the states has seen better days. could the wave of capital used to bring it up to speed help increase your cash flow? tonight, cramer sits down with the ceo of american water works just ahead. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer, #madtweets. send jim and e-mail to mad money @cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. for >>> as we approach the end of the first quarter, we are pointing out so far 2013 has been a red-hot year for ipos. last week alone we had six new deals. to get you 10% pop on the first day of trading. for of this not so great day for the averages, i thought it might be worth reminding you it's possible to m
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 7:00am EDT
a big new university called the king abdullah university of science and technology, which not only makes a saudi men and women, but mixes them with infidel men and women from all over the world. and when one of the 20 senior religious scholars was asked about the appropriateness of this on tv, he said it's wrong. and the king fired him because the king appoints these 20 people, and not surprisingly, many of the other senior men began to discover that the prophet had had his hair washed by women, and other things that made this okay. so people see this, if you will, double standard, and it has undermined it, the credibility of the religious establishment. obviously, with the deeply religious but also with those who don't mind the mixing at all, but just think it's, if they can can get the religious to approve this, why can't they make them approve more things like women driving or whatever. the second pillar of stability in the kingdom is obviously the oil wealth that buys them at least acquiescence, if not loyalty anymore, for the government and royal family. 90% of the treasury in
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 8:30pm EDT
in the market. >> absolutely. he was not a scientist. he grew very heavily on sciences. he did the thing which many americans wsh doing at that time which was to borrow heavily from european scientists to take their ideas, and find ways to make them much cheaper and more effective and put them into the market place and sell them around the globe so that was very, very important, and edison very often, he -- even with the electric light, he had to go out and -- it was always frustrated with the lack of capital support, so he had to very often go out and create his own electrical manufacturing companies, for example. he had to market this. he had to work out the as thetic of electric lights to convince people this was just not going to be a more efficient light, but that it could be beautiful in ways that gaslights could not be. >> let's talk about this technology itself and drill into this a bit. talk about for a minute what was available at the time? what was lighting europe, america, the average home and the problem that edison was solving for? >> right. people often side in the 1
CNN
Mar 19, 2013 2:00pm PDT
retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> on capitol hill today the man who runs nasa was asked, what could be done if a large meteor were headed for new york city? his answer? pray. cnn's chris lawrence has more on today's hearings. pretty scary stuff going on, chris. >> you said it, wolf. the only reason people aren't scared out of their minds is the fact that it's so rare for one of these big rocks to hit the earth. but look. there are 10,000 to 20,000 asteroids out there big enough to devastate a continent and only 10% have been detected. russians saw a flash of light and heard the sonic boom. the meteor exploded with the force of a nuclear bomb. it did $30 million in damage and injured thousands. and no one saw it coming. >> we were fortunate that the events of last month were simply an interesting coincidence rather than a catastrophe. >> reporter: the nation's top science officials were called before congress tuesday to explain what they're doing to detect similar threats from space. >> objects as large
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